The data value chain

lifecycle
The Consumer Lifecycle

The terms “Data driven” and “Big Data” are the buzz words of today, hyped definitely, but the implications and potential are real and huge! Tapping into the enormous amount of data and associating this data from multiple sources creates a data chain, proving valueable for any organisation. Creating a data value chain consists of four parts: collection, storage, analysis, and implementation. With data storage getting cheaper, the volume and variety of data available to be exploited is increasing exponentially. But unless businesses ask the right questions and better understand the value that the data brings in and be sufficiently informed to make the right decisions, it does not help storing the data. For example, in marketing, organisations can gather data from multiple sources about acquiring a customer, about the customer’s purchasing behaviour, customer feedback on different social media, about the company’s inventory and logistics of product delivery. Analyzing this stored data can lead to substantial number of customers being retained.

A few of the actionable insights can be as follows:
  • Improving SEO (search engine optimization), increasing the visibility of the product site and attracting more customers
  • CRO (Conversion rate optimization) i.e. converting prospects into sales, by analzying the sales funnel. A typical sales funnel is Home page > search results page > product page > proposal generation and delivery > negotiation > checkout
  • Better inventory control systems, resulting in faster deliveries
  • Predicting products that a consumer might be interested in, from the vast inventory, by implementing good recommendation algorithms that scan through the consumer behaviour and can predict their preferences
  • If some of the above points are taken care of, customer loyalty can increase manifold, based on the overall experience during the entire consumer lifecycle.
actionable
Data blending which leads to a Single Customer View and Actionable Insights

Often the focus lies on the Big data technology rather than the business value of implementing big data projects. Data is revolutionising the way we do business. Organisations, today, are inundated with data. To be able to make sense of the data and create a value chain, there has to be starting point and the customer is a good starting point. The customer’s lifecycle with experiences at every touch point defines business growth, innovation and product development. The big data implementations allow blending data from multiple sources leading to a holistic single view of customer, which in turn gives rise to enlightening insights. The data pretaining to customer, from multiple sources, like CRM/ERP/Order Management/Logitics/Social/cookie trackers/Click traffic etc., should be stored, blended and analysed to gain useful actionable insights.

In order to be able to store the gigantic amount of data, organisations have to invest in robust big data technologies. The earlier BI technologies that we had do not support the new forms of data sources such as unstructured data and the huge volumes, variety & velocity of data. The big data architecture consists of the integration from the data sources, the data storage layer, the data processing layer where data exploration can be performed and/or topped with a data visualization layer. Both structured and unstructured data from various sources can be ingested into the big data platform, using Apache Sqoop or Apache Flume, real-time interactive analyses can be performed on massive data sets stored in HDFS or HBase using SQL with Impala, HIVE or using statistical programming language such as R. There are very good visualization tools, such as Pentaho, Datameer, Jaspersoft that can be integrated into the Hadoop ecosystem to get visual insights. Organisations can offload expensive datawarehouses to low cost and high storage enterprise big data technology.

bigdatarch
Edited image from Hortonworks

Irrespective of the technical implementation, business metrics such as increasing revenue, reducing operational costs and improving customer experience, should always be kept in mind. The manner in which the data is analyzed could create new business opportunites and transform businesses. Data is an asset and investing in a value chain, from gathering to analyzing, implementing, analyzing the implementations and evolving continuously, will result in huge business gains.

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3 Comments

  1. I learned that many large firms have found their big data pilots shut down by compliance officers concerned about legal or regulatory violations, but the good news is that some Hadoop distributions now include integrated data security features.

    For example, Hortonworks Hadoop distribution includes advanced security features at no additional license fee. The features include data tokenization, advanced HDFS Encryption, key management and auditing.

    To reach the goal of securing the data while preserving its value for analytics, the data itself must be protected at as fine-grained a level as possible. Securing individual fields allows for the greatest flexibility in protecting sensitive identifying fields while allowing nonidentifying information to remain in the clear.

    By protecting data at a very fine-grained level—fields or even part(s) of a field—we can continue to reap the benefits of data monetization while putting forth a significant barrier to data theft. I talk more about this issue here (http://www.protegrity.com/2014/10/protegrity-cto-ulf-mattsson-featured-in-thought-leaders-in-big-data/)

    Ulf Mattsson, CTO Protegrity

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